theoneminutesjr
2012 workshops


1: 2012 workshops overview
2: Baku, Azerbaijan (5-9 March 2012)
3: Kolasin, Montenegro (26-30 March 2012)
4: Antananarivo, Madagascar (2-6 April 2012)
5: Yerevan, Armenia (9-13 April 2012)
6: Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan (16-20 April 2012)
7: Bucharest, Romania (14-18 May 2012)
8: Tarawa, Kiribati (29 May - 2 June 2012)
9: Dushanbe, Tajikistan (26-30 June 2012)
10: Pittsburgh, USA (2-7 July 2012)
11: New York, USA (10-14 July 2012)
12: Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan (3-7 September 2012)
13: Calarasi, Moldova (17-21 September 2012)
14: Odessa, Ukraine (3-7 October 2012)
15: Prey Veng, Cambodia (27 November-1 December 2012)
16: Lahore, Pakistan (3-7 December 2012)

Teenagers share visual stories on juvenile justice in Tajikistan DUSHANBE, Tajikistan, 30 June 2012 - A group of boys from different regions of the Central Asian Republic of Tajikistan participated in a OneMinutesJr video workshop in the capital Dushanbe this week. Supported by UNICEF and the European Union, the workshop focused on problems and challenges in the juvenile justice system of the country. The boys, aged 13-19, had all been in conflict with the law prior to the seminar and shared their stories and experiences throughout the five-day training. UNICEF Tajikistan organized the workshop in cooperation with the NGO Child Rights Centre and invited teenagers from Dushanbe, Khujand and Kurgan-Tyube to participate in the hands-on workshop in the capital. During the first day of the training, the teenagers shared their personal stories with the trainers and started developing storyboards for the filming. It was immediately clear that the participants felt that their rights had been violated while they were in conflict with the law. Most of them reported that police officers were extremely rude to them, that lawyers tried to trick them into admitting more crimes than they had comitted or that judges did not believe them. Also, the duration of the whole investigation was questioned, especially in a film called "3 months, 16 days". read the full article